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Roomie Respect! Vegan vs. Smoking Cocktail Swiller

In this corner weighing in at no animal protein products, ittttt’s Vegan Vitto! In this corner defending titleholder, Glam & the City! Can roomies with seemingly conflicting lifestyles live successfully under one landlord?     — BadWitch

Readers Are Spellbound & Perplexed…

Dear GWBW — I have a new roomie who’s really nice but is a total vegan and yoga nutcase. I like to drink, smoke my ciggies, and eat out (I don’t do drugs). We get along just fine, but I don’t think we approve of each other’s lifestyles. Can a veghead and a smoking carnivore get along under the same roof?  — War of the Roomies Avoider

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Dear Roomie war avoider,

How the heck did you two come together? It can sometimes be tough enough to live with people we love, share commonalities with…but I know when it comes to making the rent, we can do a lot more than we’d guess, if we set our minds and grit to it. Here’s what comes to mind immediately:

Set some house rules – most especially around food storage and other territorial netherlands. Start with comparing your separate deal breaker lists, and working down to the Would Likes. Oh and of course you may find you can live together under one roof, but you will have to smoke somewhere else, most likely.

Be respectful as you wanna be respected – this includes a brief and mutual head/life re-orienting time; check in weekly on progress and to air concerns (your case has high potential for stuffing feelings down, don’t). If you do the above robustly, this part should come more naturally for both of you — but I would do definitions here, like, “When I say X, I mean (fill in the blank specifically as you can articulate each).”

Share an outing – If you can successfully navigate #s 1 and 2 above, Pass Go and Collect $200 by trying to see if you can come up with and share an easy, low maintenance outing like a coffee/green tea, a walk, or even eating out. This civility is only meant to help shine light on the commonalities of your lives towards lessening the differences. If you two become actual friends, even better!

Hmm, you kinda have a lot of potential for cool and expanding experience here. If you both consistently focus on that as being a mutual goal — and do the work — your communications will likely come smoother, less haltingly mindful, and eventually easier. Learning how to communicate and live with people we’re different from on the surface could even begin to teach us how to be more at home with truest selves…whoa, now that’s cool.

Strawberry fields forever,

BadWitch

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Dear War of the Roomies Avoider,

What can I say, “Let there be peace on earth and let it begin with me.” I realize that your two lifestyles are very different, but judging one another is not the way to peaceful cohabitation. I also realize that some deep personal beliefs may come into play, but in the end, we are all just trying to get through this life thing. Making your roomie wrong because of seemingly austere vegan ways is not the way.

RESPECT! Respect does not mean expecting others to bend their wills to fall in line with what you believe is the best way to live your life. Respect is allowing for each person to be as they are and finding, if not acceptance, then understanding. For instance, perhaps out of respect for your roommate’s virgin lungs, you might smoke your ciggies outside. You will not only be happy for a fresher, less second-hand household. I understand the aroma of cooking beef or chicken, while delightful to some, might be trying for a vegan. Your roommate, should respect your need to cook your food in your shared kitchen, though I suggest separate pans. These are just uncomfortable bits of undefined boundaries. Work out the rules of the house so you can move on to amicably.

So, I guess what I’m saying in a very motherly tone is, “Work it out!” I should not need to come to your house to show you how to compromise effectively. Apparently, you both signed on for this cohabitation, knowing what you were getting into. Why now the judgments? Why the disdain for exercise and rigid eating habits? Why the condescension for indulging in life’s bounty? You two need to have a good, cold-hard-facts-on-the-table discussion. Work out the boundaries of you respectful compromise and get back to the business of the “who’s really nice,” you started off with.

The Vegan is no more of an exalted human because he/she does not eat any part of an animal’s flesh. You are no less of a human because you may choose to have a cigar with brandy after a nice steak. We are all spirits in this 3-D existence with our own karma and lessons to learn. We do not know what you or your roommate is intended to learn in this life. Who are you to judge the path before the other? Every human is not alike, though every human is equal in the eyes of God. The trappings and “story” we have concocted around our lives means little in the grand scheme of things. If you’ve ever lost a loved one, you know it is the loss of the spirit, the communing, the relationship that echoes loudest—not what would have ordered at a restaurant.

As I say to my own children when bickering is just easier than being respectful, “Get over it before other people start treating you that way.” You two seem to be in the throws of teaching each other the wrong things. Have an honest, respectful conversation, agree to some respectful boundaries and get on with the peaceful cohabitation.

Good luck,

GoodWitch

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Image, DrummaKween @ flickr

Juicy Coaching for Leaders and Individuals.

Mondays money, work, purpose dilemmas. Thursdays family, relationships, love dramedy. Send your FREE brewing questions on how to thrive—not just survive— modern life to: coaching@stillsitting.net.

© 2009 ManifestGroup. No materials may be used without expressed written permission.

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Not Your Daddy’s ‘Mad Men’: Working Mom, House Husband

New American Family v.3.5: mama brings home the bacon, daddy fries it up in a pan, and he never, never forgets he’s his own man. Nice upgrade!  — BadWitch P.S. Happy holidays, lovely readers! We’ll see you back here Monday.


Readers Are Spellbound & Perplexed…

Dear GWBW — My wife loves her job, is very successful and I’m a stay-at-home-dad while I’m figuring out what I want to do next with my own career. My guy friends seem to be telling me to hurry up so I don’t lose my manly edge, do you agree? — Manly Dad

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Dear Manly Dad,

Hey, Mr, Man, are your “guy friends” married, otherwise, what do their relationships look like? If your wife is happy on the home and work front, your family is rolling down the road smoothly with you at that helm from “9-to-5” (yeah right!) then I hope you won’t rush your search at the expense of another valuable experience you might not be able to get back — especially based on advice of those who may not practice what they preach.

I commend you for being uber-manly and supporting your wife’s success without any seeming issues there. Your kids and you will benefit from getting to know each other in a way not always afforded fathers and their children. If you’re genuinely happy about your role and decision to put your family first in all the ways that’s possible to you, I thank you in advance for our society at large! Last but definitely not least, I’m thrilled you’re taking time to explore and develop your own ideas about what career will serve you best. Your guy friends in question must not be doing work they love, or they’d know there’s no hurrying up this process to good effect. Get to know yourself — you’ll be a better husband, father and careerist in the long run for doing that work!

As for that “losing your manly edge” warning your seemingly insecure, scurrying friends brandish, a Real Man will always have an edge even if he were the Michelin Man on the outside.

Man up, be fully you,

BadWitch

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Dear Manly Dad,

In this economy rushing is NOT the right answer. If you are stepping back out into job market—this job market—you need to take the time to really decide where and how you want to step back in. So, no, don’t rush because your boys are threatened by this new definition of “manly” you are presenting them with.

In truth, the job of staying at home with kids is nothing to sneeze at. You are honing patience, multitasking and creativity skills on an hourly basis. You are learning how to work your audience to excite, to quiet, to inspire. And though this may not seem like much, lemme tell you, those new skills are SUPER important in the working world. It’s called PR/marketing training with a little sensitivity thrown in. Clients, coworkers and, yes, bosses, will eat it up. If you jump into sales, oh yes, these are great skills to have.

The fact that your kid(s) have you at home when Mom is working full time, is a blessing. Also for you, already having a working budget with you able to take the time to decide how you will re-enter the job market—huge blessing. Take this time and use it wisely. Work with a coach. Take some time to really decide what you want to do with your career. This time is a blessing. Wring out every ounce of the gift. Then, when yu are truly ready, you’ll be well-prepared for the next stage of your career.

Good luck,

GoodWitch

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Image, Dr. Timothy A. Pychyl

Juicy Coaching for Leaders and Individuals.

Mondays money, work, purpose dilemmas. Thursdays family, relationships, love dramedy. Send your FREE brewing questions on how to thrive—not just survive— modern life to: coaching@stillsitting.net.

© 2009 ManifestGroup. No materials may be used without expressed written permission.

Parents & Adult Kids: Different Religious Beliefs

Can Christian (or any devout denomination) parents and their strayed-from-the-flock adult children just get along? There’s a lot of love under that thar roof…and mutual respect is sacred.    — BadWitch

Readers Are Spellbound & Perplexed…

Dear GWBW — I was raised Christian but no longer go to church, but my parents are still into it. When I go home to visit them, I don’t want them ramming their religion down my throat but it’s still their house, and I’ve never figured out how to let them know respectfully. I consider myself spiritual just not religious. I’m 28.  — Respectful Son

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Dear Respectful Son,

I have a lot of questions regarding your question. I cannot know if your parents are preaching at you throughout the visit and pushing you to go to church? Are you questioned on the state of your soul and your rightness with the Christian faith? I cannot tell from your question if you are being harangued, prodded or just extra sensitive to your parent’s preaching. So with the hope that rational, non-judgmental minds wanting only the best for each other will prevail in this situation, I’ll try to answer.

I can tell you that feeling like you can share all of who you are with the people you love, most especially your parents, really does wonders for your own sense of self. Think of it as a growth opportunity that allows you to be an adult—with your parents. Though this hurdle may feel insurmountable, the truth is when you do finally present who you are what you believe to your parents in a self-accepting, confident manner, you will feel better about yourself.

Chris Rock once said, “Secrets rot the soul.” I believe this to be true, whether the secrets are huge betrayals or any of the small ways we hold back from sharing who we really are and what we really believe to fit in. If you accept who you are and what you believe, though these beliefs may differ from your parents Christian faith, you truly stand as an adult, self-affirming. You don’t hold anything back, which means you allow yourself to shine—fully.

My thought, personally, is that all faiths speak to God in their own language. So, in my world, there is room for spiritual beliefs and Christian faith to co-exist. In your parents world, it may take a straight forward, non-judgmental conversation. Let them know that you appreciate the foundation you received, and your personal beliefs have shifted. You may expect at least one or two in-depth religious arguments, but if you remain compassionate, non-judgmental and open, you will represent yourself and your beliefs well.

As my Dad said after hearing I no longer went to church, “I don’t care what you believe, only that you believe in something.” So believe.

Be thyself. Fully. Don’t hold back.

Good luck,

GoodWitch

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Dear Respectful Son,

This is a very complex question fraught with issues, but it most makes me want to respond politically: Don’t let religion kill your family’s relationship and love for each other. To put a finer point on it, to my ears, this issue is less about religion or spirituality than it is family (of individuals) dynamics development.

1) You’re 28 and on your own. 2) Your religion doesn’t define you but does it your parents? Let’s start here.

1) You da man! You’re already out there, presumably, rocking your own adult identity and…have a life. No need to prove to your parents that your choices are your own and that you’re happy, at this stage in time. Your parents, in turn, should not feel attachment to or definitively act like they hold parental final say over your adult decisions. Ideally, they should have trusted their own parenting skills and step out of your Big Boy business.

2) You say you got closer to your spirituality when you dropped the organized religion portion of the program. I’m trying hard to advise you neutrally as this is exactly what happened to me, while my own parents are very much still into their religion they raised us in. However, I am clear how much their religion means to them, how much grace and peace they derive from it, and how much they identify with their religion. I genuinely respect their church for them. Are your parents similar to mine, and if so, can you respect their choice as you want them to yours?

Then there’s that large swath of in-between gray area including the difference between spirituality vs religious (again my personal decision was far more a political than religious one), and the “you’re under their roof” bit. Whether for the holidays or any other occasion, the main difference between being a visitor and an under-age kid in their legal and spiritual charge, is huge. I am religious for balance. Maybe you can feel comfortable being your own man under your parents’ roof by accompanying them to church for a service, while clearly (and without heightened emotion) asking them not to try to recruit you back into the flock. Perhaps they will feel secure enough to allow you to be the same great son they love sans a family-sanctioned label you choose not to wear. I don’t know. You’ll just have to talk it out honestly (and with the love of mutual respect) amongst yourselves. This will all have been especially great if you have children of your own one day; maybe you’ll find you’re the gen religiosity skipped!

If there’s anything I’ve learned from being a functional adult child of functional parents, it’s that on the big issues like religion, suddenly everyone’s lost their damn minds and partying like it’s 1979. Instead, you all need to check your calendars and start a new conversation that reflects who you are today. Understand yourselves as individuals. Update your family dynamics. (Right, like when my progressive and religious mom says to my not going to church, “Oh I see,” then starts up about the importance of churchgoing again, to which I reply in my most emotionally whole and spiritual, adult and updated voice, “I see.” Sigh.) It’s all about the love — believe in that.

Respect!, brothah,

BadWitch

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Wallflower Power: A Party, No Noise Complaints

a_x-woman_green_dress_sofaQ: How many wallflowers does it take to screw up a conversation? A: *. The insensitive extrovert will do it all by himself. If it Takes All Kinds to Make the World Go ‘Round, then let’s Get This Party Started by letting those Wallflowers Rebel, Sweetheart.      — BadWitch

Readers Are Spellbound & Perplexed…

Dear GWBW — My husband is an extrovert and always makes us go to these parties. I’m a bit shy and not good at talking to new people. When we drive home he gets mad at me for being a stick in the mud. How can I overcome?  — Stuck Between a Loud & Muddy Place

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Dear Stuck,

We all think the world is exactly as we see it. Your hubby, as well as yourself. Me, too! As an extrovert, I’ve been surprised how many shy, quiet or introverted of you are, ironically, coming out of the woodwork to us here. I’m feeling like this is some kind of cool, UN-y opportunity to make the world a better place through understanding our opposites more. Read on if you agree but…

Warning! You are entering ConfrontationLand. First off, that’s a joke because most whole extroverts don’t think of talking or even strongly debating as “confrontation” and I just want you to recognize and know that right now, before moving on. Don’t anticipate pain or a blow up just because you will be simply stating your mind as an equal adult. This is your current relationship today, we’re talking about. Which brings me to why you say “always makes us go” as though you don’t have a choice. Do you truly not have one (a fundamental and serious relationship problem), or do you think, choose and therefore create this inopportunity-reality for yourself (your changeable perspective (Changing Perspective chapter))? On his side, it really bugs me that he chides you for being yourself when you’re going home. There is so much Lifetime movie fodder here! — instead, I want you to talk to him straight up, since the self-absorbed loudmouth apparently needs telling or reminding that you are less outgoing than him and always have been. That this sort of social interaction with strangers makes you feel uneasy and pushes your insecurities. And because you know he loves you so much, you know he doesn’t realize you feel like this when he insensitively insists that you go to these things. [Then take a picture of his face and email it to me.]

Rather than “fixing” either of your innate natures (or personal agendas) here, I’m going to recommend a first step of awareness through compromise. For example only, if he agrees to let you pick and choose which parties you’ll attend with him, then you promise to go to half of them. Or maybe you two can agree to stay no longer than two hours at these things. Then on your drive home develop a new habit, ga-head!, tawk amongst ya’selves and nightcap it off with a chat about something you both enjoy doing together (travel, movies, book sharing, cooking…anything!). The object here is simply to visualize pleasantries together, together. Gawd, if this bonding gets you both feeling equally loquacious, make next plans to do it!

Keep focused on the fact that you opposites came and work together as a team for a reason.

It’s yin and yang,

BW

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Dear Stuck Between,

Don’t be a wallflower! It’s time to allow yourself to shine. I realize that our society seems to exalt the shy, willowy girl, but in real life that won’t even work on the runway. You want to feel comfortable at parties? Take back your power and be the strong, beautiful you that you are.

Parties are meant for communing with fellow humans. It is a ritual for you, not for you to impress someone else. Go into parties with the goal that you will be you. You will do what feels good to you and inspires you. Think of a few conversations you would be interested in talking about, i.e. Project Runway. Then practice a few opening lines. Don’t think of this as a script, because cheesy opening lines are no better for parties than pick ups. But practicing the lines will help you feel comfortable with what you would like to communicate.

Now, get grounded. Deep breathes. That pull in your belly is a combination of anxiety and excitement. Let you mind connect with that excitement—the part of you that wants to meet cool, friendly people that you really like. This is your opportunity! Enter the room scanning the people. SMILE. It’s not about them accepting you or approving of you. It’s about you being happy, you making new friends, you having a good time.

New people are friends you have yet to meet. Reach out and be yourself. If you have to imagine them in their underwear to do it, so be it. Think, how did you meet your husband? At some point you talked to someone you didn’t know—and it worked for you. The new people you meet may be interesting enough for your interest, and maybe not. It’s like an interview, you are interviewing them as much as they are interviewing you. Is it a good fit?

Breathe. Love you and let you shine. You have a beautiful, individual perspective that you want to share and others want to receive. Do not let insecurity and fear make you a wallflower. Rise above. You are the belle of the party if you believe it. And the more you practice, the easier it is to believe.

Shine on,

GoodWitch

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Image, Karin Lowney-Seed

Juicy Coaching for Leaders and Individuals.

Mondays money, work, purpose dilemmas. Thursdays family, relationships, love dramedy. Send your FREE brewing questions on how to thrive—not just survive— modern life to: coaching@stillsitting.net.

© 2009 ManifestGroup. No materials may be used without expressed written permission.

Sparks! And Happy, Lasting relationships…?

carkissingCan you keep the red hot flame, or at least a warm fuzzy glow going in your lasting relationship? Is happy possible in long lasting relationships, even if kids are in the mix? What’s the secret ingredient?  — BadWitch

Readers Are Spellbound & Perplexed…

Dear GWBW — What’s the secret to a lasting relationship? — Married with Children

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Dear Married with Children,

That’s an easy one! Right up there with What is the meaning of life?, and What is love? While there might not be one formula because there are so many kinds of “success” when it comes to relationships, I’m going to shout it from the rooftops about the best long-term and flowing/non-rigid ones I’ve witnessed.

#1) Be truthful, be open, be kind – don’t rewind. Staying present in all its aspects is primary to attracting and maintaining strong relationships. #2) It’s important to realize that relationships are cyclical and that wonderful “hot burn” up front doesn’t last as such, nor was the brain designed to sustain it, so this is an evolutionary design, not a flaw of your relationship’s. If you’re lucky, the relationship will go longer so it can go deeper and more meaningful. #3) You don’t have to work hard at relationships – real relationships are work! If yours is totally easy peasy breezy — you’ve got a fling, not a lasting partnership. If you get to go longer and deeper, you will inevitably work through the up and down times, the hard and easy cycles, and the hots and cold of long lasting relationships.

Think of your lasting relationship like your Dream Car you finally were able to attain. Once you buy it, admire it on the driveway, lovingly caress it as you roll down the highway, then comes the maintenance and the everyday, mundane upkeep of any normal, gulp!, average car — then comes that work I was yapping about. Oi. Do it, don’t avoid it. Just as you wouldn’t drive your car into the ground, no gas, no oil, neglect basic maintenance and never wash it until cancerous rust popped up, then wonder why one day, it’s dead on the side of the road, you must do basic (preferably loving) maintenance on your lasting relationship.

Tips for more carefree relationship Oil & Lubes:

• touch each other! Hand holding is touching, too

• better bring (and keep) a sense of humor to the party yikes

• listen to what your partner is really saying and needs; if it’s not verbalized, ask

• don’t confuse your financial or other worldly concerns/woes with your relationship itself

• pick your battles; go green by conserving your energy for the important stuff

• be on each others’ side — a winning team

• don’t put others first (or between you) — even your kids!

• the time you spend apart is as important as the time you spend together. Make sure you keep yourself alive and engaged to remain a fully juicy individual. You’ll bring more to your lasting relationship together.

Most of all: have fun! Be friends. Relationships can keep us happy and alive if we remember how to make play of such important work.

Lotsa love from a lifer,

BW

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Dear Married with Children,

The secret to long-lasting relationship? Patience, patience with a good sense of humor, some compassion and more patience.

I may not be the best person to answer this question, as a happily unmarried divorcée, but I can share what I’ve learned through my journey. For instance, no matter what the to-do list, kids, cars, work, home, family and friends need, make the time in your schedules for regular dates. That’s right, dinners out, a walk in the park or maybe even a movie. The truth is it doesn’t matter if you just go to the café down the street, the point is to get just you two out of the house to talk and connect.

This time is invaluable. It gives you the chance to connect with each other on a regular basis away from “you need to do,” statements. It is the chance to let your spirits realign. To set shared goals and dreams. The point is, if you don’t make the time to connect, you may find that you no longer have anything to talk about but the to do lists. And that is the prelude to relationship disaster.

If money is an issue, start a babysitting co-op with friends. I have a group of friends who take turns watching each other’s kids every Friday, which means 3 out of 4 Fridays is date night—no extra babysitting costs, just date night.

Keeping a relationship strong is about putting time into the relationship. Making an effort to accept your partner as they are—from funky socks in the middle of the floor to that one shirt you’d rather burn than ever see them wear again.  Give love more than criticism. Give an ear, a real ear and listen to what your mate has to say. Really celebrate the good times and be that warm cozy hug when things don’t quite work out the way everyone wanted. It’s not about being Buddah. It’s about being as communicative and supportive as you would with your best friend (ladies) and courting your mate even after 10 years, like you didn’t know if you’d get a second or third date (guys).

BTW, did I mention patience? Oh yeah, and good old-fashioned sex, can only help keep the fires burning. But maybe borrow the Karma Sutra from the library and see if there isn’t something new you can try on.  Meet halfway

Happy Trails!

GoodWitch

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Image @ hubpages.com

Juicy Coaching for Leaders and Individuals.

Mondays money, work, purpose dilemmas. Thursdays family, relationships, love dramedy. Send your FREE brewing questions on how to thrive—not just survive— modern life to: coaching@stillsitting.net.

© 2009 ManifestGroup. No materials may be used without expressed written permission.

Coming out of the Closet: Confessions of the Disorganized

colorcodedcloset3To paraphrase Tina Turner, “What’s organized got to do with it?” But in order to avoid the Ike backlash of out of time and nothing done, we do need to create some structure in our lives. But when can you get the time to do the right thing to get the time to do the right thing? Ooh, stop this ride, I’m dizzy. Let’s get it together, people. Oh, and salutes to Memorial Day!   – BadWitch

READERS ARE SPELLBOUND & PERPLEXED…

Dear GW/BW – How can I ever get organized at home with so many deadlines? In fact, how will I ever finish my novel?! – Dust in the Wind, SF Valley, CA

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Dear Dust Bunny,

Just seeing your sparse, clean and succinct question makes me think you are a bunny in conflict – but neatly so. Keeping in that spirit, here are my three immediate thoughts to your question and my proposal towards solution.

1) Clutter is just postponed decisions. Postponement and procrastination are great tools for our Inner Freeze ASR Type who is at once a perfectionist over-achiever and a fearful child avoiding the disappointment of failure. Flight Types opt for running away instead of dealing. Make up your mind as to what your real priorities are.

2) Boundaries are useful for more than keeping cattle inside fences. Clear your space, mark your space(s) for specific tasks at specific times (i.e., home office is only for writing between X hours). Follow through with actions to fulfill this/these tasks.

3) Setting deadlines fuels, not kills, creativity. Get back in touch with your preconscious person. Stop editing yourself needlessly (and) early, lest you come to the Finish line empty-handed. Just Start!, to finish your thing. Consider this: your environment, external circumstances…fer cripesake, even the condition of your car (!)…are all reflections of your inner thoughts, decisions, being/vehicle. Act accordingly.

Clean up on Aisle 1!,

BW

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Dear Dust in the Wind,

Oh, I know how finding time in your day for the things you want to do for yourself can be daunting. Organizing your day when 100 unexpected items get thrown at you can seem almost impossible. But it’s not.

Create priorities for yourself. To start, write out a plan for your day. Plug in those items you can’t miss, i.e. work, shuttling kids, cooking dinner, sleep etc. The first thing you will see is that there are some hours left in the day that are not accounted for. Now, in a separate column, write out your priorities. If finishing your novel is a priority, make sure it is high on the list.

For the extra items that come in during the course of your day, prioritize them within your list of personal priorities. If someone wants you to help them do a project, that usually should not gain priority over what you have to do for yourself. It is great to help others, but remember the airplane instructions—fix your own mask, then help those around you. Face it, if you run out of steam because you’ve not been attending to your own needs—feeding yourself creatively (read: mentally, emotionally)—you will not have the bandwidth to help anyone else. You will burn out.

Once you know what you want to spend time on and what you have to spend time on, you can create a schedule that includes both.  For writing it is best to schedule it like a job, everyday at the same time. That way your creative (read: mental/emotional) time becomes a habit. This is a habit that will regularly feed your energy system and give you more energy to focus on your other time pulls. It will also give you more bandwidth to effectively help others. My children know I need my Mommy time. When I get my time, they get Happy Mommy instead of Grumpy Mommy.  They are happy to give me the space to do what I need to do for myself, because we have better interactions after I’ve taken care of myself.

Make yourself a priority. You are the ONLY one who can do that. Write out your schedule and stick to it faithfully—like an agenda to a meeting. The more you do it, the more ingrained the habit of self-care will be and the easier it will be to tell others, “I can help you on Tuesday, but not today,” or, “Sorry, I can’t help. I just don’t have the time.” You are not be selfish, you are being self-caring.

Make the time to take care of yourself. It will be for the highest benefit for everyone.

Happy writing!

GoodWitch

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Hear the coaches – Podcasts coming. Talk to the coaches! –  Personal and group coaching available.

Mondays money, work, purpose dilemmas. Thursdays family, relationships, love dramedy. Send your FREE brewing questions on how to thrive—not just survive— modern life to: coaching@stillsitting.net.

© 2009 ManifestGroup. No materials may be used without expressed written permission.