Tag Archives: business

Personality Order: Assertive Women

Maybe the old adage should be updated to “Nice Girls Finish Last.” Finding your balance to speak up for yourself.    — BadWitch

Readers Are Spellbound & Perplexed…

Dear GWBW — I’m a hard working woman. I do all right with my title and salary but would like to earn more. I think I need to become more assertive, but I’m actually worried I’ll change my personality. How do I become one without doing the other?   — Speaking Up For Myself

==

Dear Speaking Up For Myself,

Clear the path for other women, mama! Women still earn only 77 cents annually to every dollar a man makes. Aside from all the solid reasons why women would benefit from being more proactive (not wait for someone to notice their great and hard work; that’s not how it works), straightforward and expecting more, I sense you have other conflicts in this department. So I’m urging you to: Start appropriately speaking up for yourself in life and your work voice will follow suit. Assertiveness is not the same thing as aggressiveness. Look ‘em up, Polly. Get more crackers out of life.

As for your personality changing when you learn to assert yourself more — strap that helmet on because it will, but in the best ways. Instead of worrying about this, I’d like you to make two columns headed “What I Like About Myself” and the other “What I Need to Speak Up About More Often.” Go wild, cupcake! Don’t hold back. In either column. I think you’ll have fun filling these out, but if you find you have more trouble with one than the other (or both), then that’s where you really want to take some coaching from the old children’s traffic poster and: stop, look and listen.

See if your challenge is more around not liking yourself enough (subjectively, I deem having fewer than 10 Items in your “Like About Yourself” column is way too speedy a lane to be standing in in life), or scared to “Speak Up About (More).” Note that I put that in parentheses because you may already do an OK-ish job identifying issues and speaking up for yourself, but maybe, just maybe, you could stand to just amp up the frequency (not to be confused with volume) and consistency, lil lady. Lastly, please don’t worry about losing friends or hurting others’ feelings if and when you are simply speaking up for yourself…ever.

Raise your expectations,

BadWitch

==

Dear Speaking Up for Myself,

I’m confused. In what universe does speaking up for yourself mean changing your personality? The truth is the truth, whether you speak it or not. Now you can try the passive-aggressive-never-say-straight-out-what’s-on-your-mind, but getting what you want through manipulative means seems more two faced than setting the record straight.

You want people to take you seriously in business, you better start taking yourself seriously. What you care about, what you feel is valid because you care and you feel it. If you are too afraid to speak up and share what matters to your heart, how will you stick up for an idea you have on a project, budget, new hire or fire? The ability to speak up to share what’s on your mind is a critical quality for a successful business-person.

Hard working moves beyond overtime and taking on extra duties. Hard working means showing up and participating. Participating means saying what’s on your mind. If you are not showing up, bringing all your skills and ideas to the table, you’ll only be perceived as a follower. Followers don’t get the promotions, the raises or the responsibilities.

Now remember, speaking up does not mean getting defensive, argumentative or loud. It is calmly stating what is on your mind. Remember, in an idea session, everybody can be right and maybe the answer is a combination of two ideas rather than one person’s idea over another. Practice in the mirror. Start meditation classes so you are clearer with yourself about your own information. The more you feel it is acceptable to feel the way you do (because it is. Hello nature!) the easier it will be to express those feelings without self-judgment, which should make it easier to share with the rest of the world without too much defensiveness.

Good Luck,

GoodWitch

==

Image – Alexis Biedel, Glamour Magazine

Juicy Relationship Coaching for Leaders and Individuals.

Mondays money, work, purpose dilemmas. Thursdays family, relationships, love dramedy. Send your brewing questions on how to thrive—not just survive— modern life to: coaching@stillsitting.net.

© 2009-2017 ManifestGroup. No materials may be used without expressed written permission.


Share

Advertisements

Office Troublemaker Produces Work Stress

You know what they say about one bad apple… Identifying needs increases productivity. Deworming that Malus pumila.   — BadWitch

Readers Are Spellbound & Perplexed…

Dear GWBW — Help. I work with a smart small team on a pretty important project in our division. Four out of the five of us get along, and work out our challenges. There’s one person who is rude and insolent and often hogs meeting time and doesn’t share ideas. How can we deal better with this person?   — Team One

==

Dear Team One,

Are you the PM on this one? If so, it’s incumbent upon you to get everyone in the boat stroking to the same beat in the same direction. Identify what makes this troublemaker tick at his/her base. Appeal to that by managing him/her by this motivating need. For instance, time is my currency, and I respond well to being given a long leash of freedom to self-direct and manage my own. If I didn’t make my deadlines and was irresponsible to my tasks, obviously productively managing me would have to change to another tactic. Identifying what this person needs and wants (again, we’re talking fundamental motivating wants, not ridiculous fantasy items) is key to managing the trouble better, more effectively.

Also, this sort of ongoing disruption is very morale-draining for the rest of the team members who get on smoothly. Nip it in the bud. But be aware that the causes that make for bad apples can range as much as people do, from: annoyed at perceived team slackers, dissatisfaction with management, to boredom (often the disrupters can be the highest producers who are expressing frustration non-constructively; get to the root of this). Motivate everyone equally by rewarding positive and constructive behaviors. Rewards don’t have to be monetary or otherwise material — the right-tone public praise and appropriate contests between team members goes miles and miles to building camaraderie as well as laughs and bonding on a long road trip in a small vehicle. [Learn more how to deal with office “Fight” and the five other Automatic Stress Reaction (ASR) Types.]

No jerk zone offices for great good,

BadWitch

==

Mother’s Day “hang over” with the little kids leaves Good Witch speechless on today’s question. Have a fabulous week and we’ll see you back here Thursday!

==

Juicy Relationship Coaching for Leaders and Individuals.

Mondays money, work, purpose dilemmas. Thursdays family, relationships, love dramedy. Send your brewing questions on how to thrive—not just survive— modern life to: coaching@stillsitting.net.

© 2009-2017 ManifestGroup. No materials may be used without expressed written permission.

Family Business Succession, Difference of Opinion

When you’ve worked hard all your life to build something meaningful, you think twice about just giving it away. Even to your own kids. When families are split on kids taking over the family shingle.    — BadWitch

Readers Are Spellbound & Perplexed…

Dear GWBW — I’ve run a successful small business for nearly 25 years. I’m planning on retiring within the next five years. My oldest son seems to think I should automatically give him this business. While he’s worked hard for me during summers since he was 16, this is very different from being ready to step into a managerial role right now (he just graduated college). I want him to go work for someone else and learn there first, not take over mine. My wife and I disagree strongly on this.    — Elbow Grease

==

Dear Elbow Grease,

My first Real Job was in the skin-toughening media industry, and I was quite a bit younger than most peers with the same title. Except…a guy last named Sherman. His father, he boasted to me, owned a reputable and thriving business that he had a burning itching to join and eventually run. He was reasonable but still lamented that his dad refused him (and hard) which was why he was now working with the likes of me…!

I agree with you, Elbow Grease. Your son will do well to apprentice (preferably somewhere else first — if for no other reason than objectivity of business lessons without family dynamics possibly obscuring his clarity) before prepping to take the reins of the family business, but as that’s not really the main issue I see here. You and your wife benefit from getting on the same page about this so that, ideally (being a family business), you can present a united front to your son. It’s possible she’s simply seeing his interests through her mother’s eyes rather than the business as a full blown enterprise that needs proper tending. Talk operational details to her, and if any, highlight those that your son’s experience level clearly isn’t to par on…yet. Barring unity on the issue, as it sounds like you actually run this business, you should gather your thoughts and present them rationally and if he’s truly serious about this endeavor, he will adapt just fine.

Effectively grandfathering into a leadership role of an established business takes more than just work hours. If your son can successfully navigate potential rejection, hard knocks in this market, disciplining and/or mentoring by an objective manager or two, then he will be far more equipped to learn the ropes and rise in your family business, and eventually possibly run it. There’s no telling a BadWitch that there’s any substitute for a strong work ethic, get-over-yourself/never-take-it-personally thick skin and pragmatic stamina in the work world, to build character, put one’s mind right about one’s place in the world and the biggest lesson of all — earning your reputation and everything you’ve got — humility. Then he’ll be ready to work/transition with you, because for him by then, the business will truly mean something more than a living, prestige or other immature view of such a blessed heirloom.

The old fashioned way,

BadWitch

==

Dear Elbow Grease,

Though I appreciate your beliefs on children earning privileges and your commitment to hard work, I have to side with your wife on this one. It sounds like you’ve raised a son who is dedicated to the family business and who is no stranger to hard work. So, if you’re planning to retire and your son wants to take over, why would you want him to work for someone else to learn the ropes.

I understand that you have some trouble seeing him as a leader, as he is just graduating from college, but age alone does not distinguish one’s ability to run a business. CEOs come as young as 13 years old these days. Drive and determination are not defined by how old you are.

Your son has work experience. He wants to be involved in the family business. You are not retiring for 5 years. Why not spend those 5 years training him to take over your business. The work experience he would get from other companies will not be specific to your company’s needs. You have 5 years to give him specialized training on what he will need to know to run your company effectively after you have retired. Isn’t that better than having him work for another company for those 5 years and then trying to learn how to run your business years down the line without your guidance?

You have the opportunity to direct his training through the departments you believe he should have hands on experience. You can oversee his managerial style. You can work with him as he begins to see new ways to improve work flow through your business. You would have the opportunity to work through —with him—to manage how improvements are instituted. You have the opportunity to train the person who will carry on your family business. That seems like an opportunity that should not be ignored.

Good luck,

GoodWitch

==

Juicy Relationship Coaching for Leaders and Individuals.

Mondays money, work, purpose dilemmas. Thursdays family, relationships, love dramedy. Send your FREE brewing questions on how to thrive—not just survive— modern life to: coaching@stillsitting.net.

© 2009-2017 ManifestGroup. No materials may be used without expressed written permission.

Work Loafer Puts the zzzzzZZ’s in Costanza

Maybe there’ll be a rush on glass desks at the Depot. What to do if an employee “goes green” at work by recycling his desk as a napping den.    — BadWitch

Readers Are Spellbound & Perplexed…

Dear GWBW — I supervise this kid (not really, he’s 25) who I caught sleeping under his desk. Yes! He pulled a Costanza at work. When I reprimanded him, he told me midday napping helps build his brain. I was so pissed off, I don’t even know where to start with my real questions! Help me out. Daycare Supervisor

==

Dear Daycare Supervisor,

I get your disbelief at the audacity, as I had one employee report another for this exact same behavior a while back. I guess I’m naively shocked it’s still happening today, given the job market. This sort of bad decision making just proves: people are still people.

While his comment to you is scientifically true, napping does have a sort of cache-clearing effect on short term memory to allow for better learning of new information, in this context, his smarmy excuse only serves to lengthen the evidence list of his poor decision making. If this employee has exhibited this behavior only once, your verbal warning, an explanation if necessary as to why sleeping is inappropriate in the office, as well as an attempt to hear from him why (not excuse) this behavior occurred, should more than suffice. If it’s a pattern, or escalates to one, give him a written warning with consequences (suspension without pay, firing, etc.). Keep in mind, depending on the product/service environment (i.e., creative, tech, some start-ups), some workplaces have a very loose “policy” around the hours employees work (and rest on premise), so first check with your HR department for your official policy if this sort of cultural norm is cloudy or otherwise eludes you.

Or else, take a deep breath whenever dealing with someone who has a snappy answer even while being disciplined, and realize that he is pushing boundaries — and yours and his officemates’ are at stake here. Workplace morale starts with exhibited behavior — top down. Set the bar where you want it. [And then exercise your best judgment case by case, as even I, Saint BadWitch, have been so exhausted at work I’ve slept behind closed doors, but not habitually.]

Wink, singular,

BadWitch

==

No doubt she’s under that desk sleeping herself! GoodWitch is MIA here today because she is on doula duty…and has been so for the past shift and a half of  the hospital staffers around them. Please join me in sending new mama, papa and baby bears much love, joy and wellness!

UPDATE: Welcome to our latest Fan: Orlando Sean Grace DeLeon, 8lbs 8 oz, 21.75″, of bouncing baby boy! (3.29, 3:27A…sleep..now… http://bit.ly/a7Kb0u)

==

Image @ SodaHead

Juicy Relationship Coaching for Leaders and Individuals.

Mondays money, work, purpose dilemmas. Thursdays family, relationships, love dramedy. Send your FREE brewing questions on how to thrive—not just survive— modern life to: coaching@stillsitting.net.

© 2009-2017 ManifestGroup. No materials may be used without expressed written permission.

Office Plagiarism: Credit Where It’s Due

Hearing the words, “You’ve been robbed!” is only acceptable at a recreational ballgame, never in your personal career. What to do when the Idea Elves visited you overnight.    — BadWitch

Readers Are Spellbound & Perplexed…

Dear GWBW — How do I deal with a work peer who steals a lot of my ideas? He takes credit for my work and I find out after the fact. This has happened twice now.  — Peered Off

==

Dear Peered Off,

They say imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, but I know firsthand it’s often just flippin’ annoying. Keep your “flattery” to yourself and come up with your own damn ideas! I Get you, Peered. But all ideas aren’t created equally: for those truly original, game-changers you want to protect yourself, but for creative everyday concepts, boundary etiquette might suffice. Furhermore, don’t automatically jump to conclusions but prove you’ve been robbed before taking a more drastic move with management or beyond.

Beware your approach but approach your alleged pickpocket. First, have a plan, a goal. It’s most important here to bring his behavior to light and let him know in no uncertain terms you’re not ok with it. However, getting/taking credit yourself isn’t automatically the ultimate goal in every instance. If the larger group goal is met and served far more than any individual being given credit for a line item idea, then handle your emotions and step off. Weigh this for balance. While some anti-“snitching” cultures do controversially exist, I’m not aware of any culture where it’s ok to steal. In the workplace where a potential consequence is your being held back in some form, theft of your ideas is a double no-no.

Ideas are a dime a dozen — take comfort in knowing it takes real genius (which is not all about the brain power) to know how to bring them to fruition. Some hot ideas are already germinating in the ether and it could be a coincidence rather than a theft of yours (sure!, even twice possibly). People are often subconsciously influenced by thoughts or words they hear, and sometimes unknowingly repeat them as their own (even brainiacs in their fields — see: the Beatles!). Neutrally ask him how he came up with the idea. When? If you need to, take him back and refer to your notes (start keeping them if you don’t already; I date mine without fail) on the idea or when you brought them up in another meeting. Pulling out your documentation during a meeting becomes an option, but one you want to make sure doesn’t make you look like the petty ass. Oftentimes, collaboration is the path to creative solutions. Honor your own boundaries by letting people know consistently (through well-placed word but regular action) to be respected, but pick your battles wisely, and if it makes sense to, bring in the troops.

Be your own anti-theft device,

BadWitch

==

Dear Peered Off,

Plagiarism is a serious charge. But, God knows, it happens—in term papers and the office. Unfortunately you can’t go around copyrighting every thought and even if you could, it may not serve you. Neither will vengeance.

If your co-worker is your boss, well, you have no recourse for the whole taking credit for your brain trust. Think of it as being noticed by the higher ups. It reeks of job security. Recognize how the political system works. Do not compromise your job or your boss’ ego by dropping in a well placed, “That’s what I thought when I came up with it.” It isn’t actually well placed and could relive you of that job security thing. Suck it up. Breathe and wait to share your ideas in a crowded meeting room.

If your coworker is in fact, just a peer, well, then…Again, do not try to upstage with a well placed, “that’s what I thought…” Bide your time, hold your tongue and keep your great ideas to yourself. Share separately and quietly with those involved in hiring and firing and running the department. Perhaps ideas in a well placed memo?  Then, when your buddy decides to plagiarize your thoughts and ideas, the one’s who need to know will already know—without you saying a word.

I will say, document your thoughts. Do not share off the cuff great ideas with this coworker, as clearly this guy is looking for great ideas to take credit for. But, at the same time, this is a balancing act, because sharing ideas for the overall goal of success for the team is necessary for success for the team. Share in collaborative meetings. If these meetings include your coworker who then presents to your boss as “I,” well, then I might drop in a humble but accurate “we” to help your coworker realize that plagiarism and credit stealing is easily done and very much NOT appreciated.

Sadly, your coworker may not even realize the “I” has taken the place of the “we.” But as I said, if it seems fully calculated, set your coworker up for the fall of his (or her) own making. Put the people who should know you are the brain trust in the know.

But, a side note. Be sure that collaborative work is not getting filed under your “I” either. As I said, plagiarism is a serious charge, in or out of the boss’ office.

Good Luck,

GoodWitch

==

Juicy Relationship Coaching for Leaders and Individuals.

Mondays money, work, purpose dilemmas. Thursdays family, relationships, love dramedy. Send your FREE brewing questions on how to thrive—not just survive— modern life to: coaching@stillsitting.net.

© 2009-2017 ManifestGroup. No materials may be used without expressed written permission.

Independence, Recipe for Boundaries or Rejection?

rejection.dogThe fast food slogan ‘Have it your way’ serves up more ingredients for our recent chats about boundaries. What if living your independence ends up losing you friends and loved ones?  — BadWitch

Readers Are Spellbound & Perplexed…

Dear GWBW — I am looking at starting a small business, but struggling with the call of safety of having a regular job. I think it would be darn good for me to go out and try it alone. However, some elements of my background are getting in the way. I have fear; the fear of those past people and experiences where I had no knowledge of boundaries, and people could go where they wanted with me. I still have trouble realising I am in charge now…and this makes me afraid of being vulnerable as a business operator (small and female in a non-traditional area in a chauvinist culture). I am afraid what will happen if my former supporters turn into critics because I am now competing; afraid what will happen if someone doesn’t pay me or gets aggressive; afraid to be my own boss because even when surviving I was driven by someone else’s demands on me. — Looking for the Courage to Go It Alone?

==

Dear Looking for the Courage,

Seeking independence does mean recognizing and respecting your boundaries—even in the face of rejection. It also means building on the sometimes-uncomfortable memories of the past and stepping out into the light of a new day. This may not be comfortable, but it is necessary if you are going to move forward.

I understand the apprehension of starting a new business in this economy, but if you have your emergency fund together and a good business plan under your arm, there’s no reason to hold yourself back—especially if the only thing holding you back is the past.

Many of us have even recent memories of not standing up for ourselves or letting others make our decisions for us. The first step is to recognize the situation, which you are, and then being conscious of your choices as you move forward. If you wonder if you are doing something you want to do or being unduly influenced by other people and external circumstances—STOP! Do not make the snap decision. Instead, take the time to evaluate how your body is responding. In a quite setting, close your eyes and imagine yourself doing the action you are considering. If you feel uneasy, queasy or uncomfortable, you are trying to validate something, which does not agree with your inner self. If, however, you feel equally worried and excited, chances are you are doing it for yourself and have a healthy dose of caution to guide your steps forward.

Fear is a mouse with a megaphone. It uses the shadow of worst-case scenarios and everyday worries mixed with past regrets to keep you stuck. Don’t let it. If you have the wherewithal to recognize that you have not always upheld your own personal boundaries, you have the wherewithal to change that behavior. Decide that you will listen to your own inner voice first.

Perhaps while you are considering all the changes self-employment holds for you, you can also start regular meditation where you ask yourself the question most of us do not ask enough, “What do I want?” Picture yourself in charge and doing a great job. Picture yourself facing a difficult decision, telling the other person, “I’ll get back to you,” and then meditating alone in your office, feeling if your body and emotions are pro or con. Then picture yourself making the tough decision and everything working out well. The more you picture yourself in charge and making it work, the more easily you are able to do it in real life. You are visualizing yourself in control, but more importantly, you are training your body to remember what it feels like to be in charge and successful.

The ball is not only in your court, but in your hands. Would be critics cannot stand in your way unless you let them. Think of it this way, if they are taking the time to criticize you, they must worried about you as competition. That speaks directly to your abilities. If you decide to move forward into this new life of independence, you must be ready for all the hard work—inside and out. Don’t be afraid to make the hard choices.

You will still have friends and supportive colleagues even if you make the hard decisions and are occasionally a hard ass to get things done. Stand up for yourself. The people who matter will always back you up. If they don’t, you know you no longer need to expend extra energy worry about their needs. Be good to yourself—first. Now take a deep breath and step out into the light of a new day.

Good luck and many blessings,

GoodWitch

==


Dear Courage Alone,

Props for taking charge of your thoughts and decisions — your life! Keep going with your commitment to yourself. The toughest part about “courage” is that its very nature is solitary. When we add new skills to courageous acts like standing up and for ourselves truthfully, it can often feel like we’re operating on shaky ground…not to mention some of  the “friends” and others we might also lose from our new lives. Courage, just keep going. I want you to focus on the right things, and after all the challenging work you’ve obviously done to get yourself as far as you have, you will finish your own marathon towards the Self-empowerment/-responsibility finish line by…keeping on going on.

If we break down the issues you’ve presented — wow!, that’s a lot on the Con side of the list to starting your own business. Now let’s right focus on the Pro column.

Pro-Courage reasons for fuller, truthful living:

a)     “safety” is a delusion and that you call it a “regular job” suggests that you maybe don’t consider it very special, either. Recognizing your thoughts through the language you’re using is critical

b)    past people and past experiences are exactly…there! Happily, you are in the present, today, now. In old hippie-ese: Be here now. You’ve realized much and come a long way to identifying and understanding that they do not have boundaries — but now you do. Another critical difference

c)     you are what you think, so be sure to be the Boss of You, Courage! Getting used to not asking someone else for action permission, is inclusive of owning your power in your personal life. When you wane or feel weak get in front of a mirror and say out loud, “I have authority as an adult and the owner of this company.” Repeat. Put some practice hours in

d)    girrrrrll!, you live in a chauvenisitc culture 24-7, so at work or play, it’s what you make of it. Don’t feel and say you’re “vulnerable” and you won’t be (or at least less so, in the beginning as you adjust). There’s no more potent fuel to a fire than an empowered woman who balances her charm, strength and brains. Kaboom! Trust me, people are curious, enchanted and stick around just to check it out and then…convinced. Practice consistency.

e)    honey, losing former “supporters” turned nay sayers is far cheaper than having them hanging around your neck choking your life force to death with their negative and false energies. As for getting paid, you are a creditor, just imagine how yours would approach you for overdue money. Your biggest issue here is not coming off as the Bad Guy when you are also the Sales Gal. A legitimate concern but doesn’t have to be a huge problem. Set your boundaries right up front (in contract, sales ticket/invoicing language, etc.) and consistently. People in business are generally not out to screw you!, and when they know what is expected of them they usually follow through. If you find your business is attracting clients who repeatedly try to get over on you, stop attracting them! Not all business is “good” business. You’re learning how to differentiate worthy companions on all levels

f)    Self-drive is important. In order to truly move forward in life, we must have a passion for self-improvement. If you want to see what you can do next, are curious about what tomorrow holds for you…then put oil in your engine and gas up the tank, darlin’. Then you just have to step on the gas and steer and you’ll be moving forward.

You’re already in such good shape, Courage. I am thrilled for you. Only you have the power to genuinely reject yourself — keep practicing every day and you will prove and impress, love and improve yourself for the only person who really counts: You. You will start to expect better (not just more) for yourself. And what will all this self-governing independence yield you? Less leaked energy, healthier relationships, knowing your own boundaries. You’re going to fly, baby.

Big ups,

BW

==

Juicy Coaching for Leaders and Individuals.

Mondays money, work, purpose dilemmas. Thursdays family, relationships, love dramedy. Send your FREE brewing questions on how to thrive—not just survive— modern life to: coaching@stillsitting.net.

© 2009 ManifestGroup. No materials may be used without expressed written permission.

Share

I See Green Chutes. Do You?

obama.econ.advsrsPresident Obama sees ’em. In his economy update last Tuesday in Georgetown, while wary to declare “good news” too certainly or too soon, he did say he and his economic team “are starting to see glimmers of hope.” Chair of Council for Economic Advisers, Christina Romer, said that while there will be inevitably more job losses and pain, she expressed hope that we could bottom out by Q3 or Q4 this year “and then actually, finally be on the upswing.” No on really knows anything, but how do YOU feel about things financial, nationally and personally?? Sound off in Comments. — BadWitch

Readers Are Spellbound & Perplexed…

Dear GW/BW – How do I keep a healthy economic outlook when all I’m hearing is gloom and doom? — Small Business Owner, Oakland, CA

==

Dear Small Business Owner,

You ask a legitimate question in a loaded way. It sounds to me like you already believe a healthy economic outlook is an optimistic one, despite a storm of gloom and doom forecasting and media babbling. Here’s me supporting you: spread the seeds of confidence, the lack of it is a huge contributing factor to this crisis. Follow your actual (and useful) industry trends, but don’t watch the news in an unfocused way. Focus more on the micro pieces you can control, and just keep an informed eye on the macro ones you can’t. Keep doing what you do best. Run your business in the unique way only you can offer your clients and peers. Cut your costs, protect your assets, but also keep your eye out for opportunities this time of challenge might actually offer you. Stay focused on the right things, SBO. Keep your optimistic view alive through wise and realistic choices and business best practices I suspect you have already observed in the last down cycle.

Keep investing in the faith,

BW

==

From GoodWitch:

Faith means believing in something you can’t feel or see or touch. It’s knowing in your heart that despite what the outward appearances tell you, something better is destined for you. In these times of economic transition, we need to hold on to faith that the good times will return, even though the news forecasts doom and gloom at every turn. Faith, self-reliance and common sense are needed right now. Take a deep breath, click your heels three times if you need to and remember, it may not look right now and it may not look like our perfect picture, but it will be all right. How do you know? Faith.

— GoodWitch

How do I keep a healthy economic outlook when all I’m hearing is gloom and doom? —Gloominous Doom

Dear Gloominous Doom,

Not to sound like your mother, but if everybody was jumping off a bridge, would you jump? We may think, of course not, but here we are unable to picture a bright beautiful new beginning for our economy because we keep hearing gloom and doom stories on the news, in the paper and from just about anyone else we’re willing to listen to. Stop! This is no time to jump just because everyone else is. Listen, everyone was sure the Titanic was unsinkable. Did that make it so?

It is time to remember that the Great Depression was quite the opportunity for many people. Rockefeller, Odlum, Keynes all made hundreds of millions during the Great Depression. What does this mean? Crisis can actually mean opportunity if you stay grounded, hold on to the possibility of a better tomorrow and keep sharp for sows ears that can be refurbished into silk purses.

Our economy is going through a HUGE transition. Corrections must be made. The wealth must be distributed more equitably. Now is the time when someone with gumption, foresight and the drive to make it can create new wealth for themselves. Bootleggers, like the Kennedy’s, made HUGE family fortunes during the Depression. Keep your eyes open. If you believe you can create better for yourself than what you’ve seen on the news about rising unemployment and plummeting stock prices, you can.

Sound all rose colored glasses to you? It shouldn’t. Life is cyclical. Sometimes we’re up and sometimes we’re down. This is economically as well as in any other area of life. The trick is to stay optimistic during the down times that a positive outcome is possible. John D. Rockefeller said, “These are days when many are discouraged. In the 93 years of my life, depressions have come and gone. Prosperity has always returned and will again.” And, let’s face it, he made out all right during the Depression.

Listen, the future won’t fix itself without some hard work on our parts, some tough decision-making and, quite frankly, a heaping helping of faith that the down part of the cycle will eventually come up again. Do the work. Start that business on the side that has been your life-long dream. Remember that designer labels don’t make you likeable or lovable. Get rich schemes usually only work for the Madoff who came up with the scam in the first place. Save where you can and plan on a better day. And, at least a couple nights a week, turn off the news. Focus on what you want to create for yourself and let yourself out of the societal box of “this is how you get rich” or “I need to do this to be accepted.” All bets are off now. It’s up to you, your creativity, your own hard work and the opportunities you can carve out for yourself to move forward to a better tomorrow.

Remember your optimism and, please, try to play nice with the other weary travelers on the road.

Believe to achieve,

GW

==

Hear the coaches – Podcasts coming. Talk to the coaches! –  Personal and group coaching available.

Mondays money, work, purpose dilemmas. Thursdays family, relationships, love dramedy. Send your FREE brewing questions on how to thrive—not just survive— modern life to: coaching@stillsitting.net.

© 2009 ManifestGroup. No materials may be used without expressed written permission.